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Wednesday, May 3

  1. page NEOCLASSICISM edited ... From Neoclassicism to Romanticism NEOCLASSICISM NEOCLASSICISM Meaning of the term The Ro…
    ...
    From Neoclassicism to Romanticism
    NEOCLASSICISM
    NEOCLASSICISM
    Meaning of the term
    The Rococo style was replaced by the Neoclassical style, which was perceived as more .
    The term Neoclassical:
    o Neo =
    o Classical = refers to the works of ancient & .
    Big Concepts / Developments
    Industrial Revolution - The late eighteenth century was the age of the Industrial Revolution.
    o Name one (1) material that was introduced to the field of architecture.
    o How did the introduction of this new material affect the cost of bronze?
    o Populations boomed as mass-production, technological innovation, and medical science marched relentlessly forward. Despite the improvements in the quality of life that the Industrial Revolution yielded, provide a response that speaks to the negative aspect/s of such developments – namely as it pertains to the workers.
    The Enlightenment
    o The Enlightenment brought about a rejection of royal and aristocratic authority. A period of transformation took place, in which philosophers and scientists based their ideas on and , rather than tradition and folk .
    o The Enlightenment represented a deliberate of knowledge...
    § The figure (1713-1784) organized and edited a massive 52-volume French encyclopedia in 1764.
    § The figure (1709-1784) composed the first English dictionary single-handedly in 1755.
    § Jean-Jacques Rousseau discussed how a legitimate government was an expression of the general will in his 1762 work entitled the .
    What did these societal changes mean for artists?
    Some artists, like Jacques Louis David, were caught up in the politics of the time and advocated the sweeping societal changes that they thought the French Revolution espoused.
    (The geographic location within Italy) = nexus of inspiration [for Neoclassicist artists].
    Rome was the place to be – to see the past. New artistic life was springing up all over Europe, leaving Rome as of inspiration and tradition, but not of progress.
    A huge discovery
    Italy's seminal position as a cultural cornucopia was magnified in 1748 by the discovery of the buried city of . Suddenly genuine Roman works were being dug up daily, and the world could admire an entire ancient city.
    Winckelmann's publication
    The discovery of Pompeii inspired art theorist Johann Winckelmann (1717-1768) to publish in 1764, which many consider the first art history book. Winckelmann heavily criticized the waning Rococo as decadent, and celebrated the ancients for their of form and crispness of execution.
    Rise of the Academy Structure
    Because of renewed interest in studying the ancients, art academies began to spring up around Europe and in the United States. Artists were trained in what the academy viewed as the proper tradition, part of that training sent many artists to Rome to study works firsthand.
    Neoclassical architecture
    Name the two (2) main influences for Neoclassical architecture:
    1. Renaissance architect
    2. &
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used and some may be used more than once.)
    Democratic
    Classical
    Wisdom
    Intellectual
    Logic
    Observation
    Structuring
    Denis Diderot
    Samuel Johnson
    The Social Contract
    Rome
    Turbulent
    Custodian
    Purity
    Pompeii
    The History of Ancient Art
    Andrea Palladio
    Inigo Jones
    Stylistic Characteristics
    1. COMPOSITION
    How would you describe the manner in which the compositions were designed?
    2. SUBJECT MATTER
    The type of paintings favored = painting.
    Scenes from pre- Rome.
    Even if works of art depict current events or contemporary portraits, there are frequent allusions.
    Several factors helped shape "what" (the subject matter) artists were including in their work:
    French Academy
    o Those deemed 'noble' and were scenes from classical antiquity... history paintings.
    Unearthing of
    o The fact that the entire city of Pompeii was rediscovered at this time invariably contributed to the fact that:
    § French Academies thrived in the first place, but...
    § Artists began to include, with great frequency, figures relating to classical antiquity (the very land being excavated).
    Politics
    o Artists associated with the revolutionary causes in France used pre- Roman subjects as a model through which they amplified their own visions of what they wished to achieve in their own country. The ideals associated with this pre- time were treasured by those who had become disenchanted with the French monarchy's inability to administer fair and just rule in the land.
    3. INTERPRETATION
    Whereas the playful (<<< hint: art style) art maintained a lighthearted quality that, for the most part, lacked true substance, works created in the Neoclassical period drew upon the Enlightenment's charge for imbuing , meaning, substance into that which one decides to do. Therefore, all subject matter, superficiality, and flights of aristocratic fancy were replaced with substantial, purpose-driven themes, individuals, and events... for, this new art was used as a means to bring much more than 'pleasure' to the mere eyes of select individuals, but as a visual catalyst through which the eyes of the entire democracy would transmit to their hearts the underlying 'substance' communicated in the paint... the stuff powerful enough to encourage a
    : Remaining calm, cool, and collected under extreme emotional pressure.
    over - using one's mind to suppress / control the emotions.
    : self-sacrifice for the greater good (for the Republic...the people)
    4. PROPAGANDA
    Imagery directed towards the in order to their opinion for a particular cause.
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used and some may be used more than once.)
    Acceptable
    Classical
    Frivolous
    History
    Influence
    Masses
    Passion
    Patriotism
    Pompeii
    Reason
    Republican
    Rococo
    Stoicism
    OTHER CHARACTERISTICS
    1. Color is very limited / restrained; the most commonly used color is .
    2. The sense of is restrained for the most part; figures appear statuesque. The reason for this may be due to the fact that many were drawn from ancient statues, but also because the artists wished to imbue their figures with a sense of immobility.
    3. Lack of ; space employed to force the action to the . Many backgrounds are mere backdrops in Neoclassical painting.
    4. Emphasis on edges; emphasis on and drawing.
    5. Physical texture: canvas; not painterly.
    6. In general, Neoclassical works of art meant to appeal to the , the democracy, the population at . The idea and importance placed on the specific, the individual was small. The message needed to have appeal.
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used and some may be used more than once.)
    Back
    Blue
    Classical
    Deep
    Depth
    Front
    General public
    Hard
    Individual
    Line
    Red
    Rough
    Shallow
    Shape
    Smooth
    Soft
    Space
    Specific
    Universal
    Yellow
    Artists to examine

    The Rococo style was replaced by the Neoclassical style, which was perceived as more democratic.
    Neo = new
    (view changes)
    8:38 pm

Monday, May 1

  1. page BAROQUE - Dutch Terr. edited ... The title "Dutch Baroque" would be considered a bit of a misnomer, because the term …
    ...
    The title "Dutch Baroque" would be considered a bit of a misnomer, because the term "baroque" refers to the general characteristics inherent in the European art of the 17th Century (see below).
    For your reference, click this link to view the Stylistic Characteristics of Baroque - as they apply generally to Europe.
    ...
    it's not Ba-roque,Baroque, don't fix it.
    (So,
    it - so, what's up
    ...
    the term "BAROQUE" ?)BAROQUE?
    The term
    ...
    the late 18th( )th C / early 19th( )th C by
    ...
    the preceding Renaissance (a( ) [a style which
    ...
    'art' should be).be]. The word
    ...
    translates to "misshapen"( ) pearl". The derogatory( ) implications of
    ...
    has remained.
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used)
    Derogatory
    Flattering
    Medieval
    Misshapen
    Renaissance
    Sparkling
    17(th); 18(th)
    18(th); 19(th)
    19(th; 20(th)

    Timeline of 17th Century Dutch Painters & Interactive Map of the Principle Centers of Artistic Production (c/o Essential Vermeer) - link
    A bad classification?
    {Screen_shot_2012-05-02_at_9.51.40_PM.png}
    ...
    and large, Protestant (Calvinist)( ) [Calvinist] in nature;
    ...
    the South (Flanders)( ) remained ardent in their Catholic( ) faith. While
    ...
    extremely different -- in subject,
    ...
    style, and purpose --( ) – despite the
    ...
    in close proximity( ) to one another.
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used)
    Catholic
    Flanders
    France
    Holland
    Protestant
    Proximity
    Shine

    The Dutch Divide: North vs. South
    (In search of appropriate labels...)
    ...
    the "Dutch Republic".( )". This region
    ...
    area of Holland.( ).
    The southern
    ...
    remained under Spanish( ) control, and
    ...
    corresponds to Belgium.( ).
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used)
    Belgium
    Flanders
    French
    Holland
    Netherlands
    Spanish

    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRoZLo7WG1I/AAAAAAAAA2s/v58WJs_W8zo/s400/M2501.jpg}
    Map of 17 C Europe
    ...
    Peter Paul Rubens (traveled extensively >>> a pan-European art)
    Anthony Van Dyck (born in Antwerp, but traveled to Genoa and London)
    LINKS
    For your reference, click this link to refer to the European regions that responded to the "Baroque" style.
    Differences of the "Baroque style" [Northern vs. Southern Europe] through examination of Rubens and Rembrandt's art (c/o Smart History) - video link
    ...
    TYPES OF PAINTING
    (that became popular in the DUTCH REPUBLIC)
    1) LandscapesLandscape
    scenes in
    ...
    the surrounding natural( ) world
    Marine

    ( )
    painting emerged
    ...
    'type' of still-life
    Church
    still-life, often featuring ships on stormy seas.
    ( )
    painting -
    ...

    2) Still-lives (specialization[( ) was necessary
    ...
    demand for these!)these!]
    flower painting
    vanitas (also referred to as memento mori)
    fowl and other game animals
    breakfast pieces
    StillLink: Still Life Painting
    ...
    Portraits of notable( ) individuals
    merchants
    commemorative( ) portraits (marriages,
    ...
    prestige, etc.)
    group

    ( )
    portraits (cloth
    ...
    Genre scenes (scenes- scenes of everyday life)( ) life.
    side note 1: Many of these paintings were executed on a rather small scale.
    ...
    longer the church,( ), a very
    ...
    of the middle( ) class patron
    ...
    art collector.
    WORD BANK (Use the best word for each blank; Not all words may be used)
    Artificial
    Anonymous
    Church
    Commemorative
    Everyday
    Group
    Marine
    Middle
    Natural
    Notable
    Specialization
    Upper

    ARTISTS
    REMBRANDT
    (view changes)
    5:46 am
  2. page BAROQUE - Dutch Terr2 edited OBJECTIVES 1. Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of 17th-century art and archit…
    OBJECTIVES
    1. Identify the formal and iconographic characteristics of 17th-century art and architecture
    2. Understand the diversity of forms and iconography in 17th-century art and architecture
    3. Discuss the significance of social and political events in the production and use of art and architecture
    4. Explain how absolutist rhetoric is embodied in examples of 17th-century art and architecture
    5. Describe the influence the Catholic Counter Reformation exerted on 17th-century art and architecture
    6. Explain the significance of the classical tradition in examples of 17th-century art and architecture
    7. Analyze the shifting status of artists and architects in the 17th century
    Dutch Art of the 17th Century
    Outline for this page:
    Baroque - meaning of the term
    reference / link to Baroque stylistic characteristics
    Baroque - a misnomer for the Dutch territories
    The Dutch divide (North / South)
    reference / link to Regions of the Baroque style
    Types of painting in the Dutch Republic
    Artists of the Dutch Republic
    LINKS - Dutch Art of the 17th Century (general)
    Gardner's Online Study Guide: Northern Europe (1600-1700) - link
    17th Century Painting (c/o The Rijksmuseum) - link
    Information on the Reformation (Smarthistory) - link
    Baroque - Dutch territories...er, I mean "Seventeenth-century art of the Dutch Republic"
    The title "Dutch Baroque" would be considered a bit of a misnomer, because the term "baroque" refers to the general characteristics inherent in the European art of the 17th Century (see below).
    For your reference, click this link to view the Stylistic Characteristics of Baroque - as they apply generally to Europe.
    If it's not Ba-roque, don't fix it.
    (So, what's up with the term "BAROQUE" ?)
    The term "baroque" was coined in the late 18th C / early 19th C by historians, through their efforts to distinguish this later style of European art (which they deemed as lacking, insufficient) from that of the preceding Renaissance (a style which maintained the character and quality satisfactory of their expectations of what 'art' should be). The word "baroque" actually translates to "misshapen pearl". The derogatory implications of this label have since lost their power, but the initial term used to describe this art has remained.
    Timeline of 17th Century Dutch Painters & Interactive Map of the Principle Centers of Artistic Production (c/o Essential Vermeer) - link
    A bad classification?
    {Screen_shot_2012-05-02_at_9.51.40_PM.png}
    The problem with this classification for the Dutch territories at this time, however, is that Dutch art of the North was, by and large, Protestant (Calvinist) in nature; whereas the Dutch territories lying to the South (Flanders) remained ardent in their Catholic faith. While there are always exceptions and subtle cross-over between the two, it is this very difference in religious faith that caused the work produced in the Seventeenth Century to appear extremely different -- in subject, patronage, style, and purpose -- despite the fact that the North and South Dutch regions existed in close proximity to one another.
    The Dutch Divide: North vs. South
    (In search of appropriate labels...)
    Therefore, the more appropriate title for the work produced in the northern centers such as Delft, Amsterdam, Leiden, and Haarlem at this time would be that from the "Dutch Republic". This region is also referred to as the United Providences of the Netherlands and corresponds to the present day area of Holland.
    The southern Dutch provinces remained under Spanish control, and therefore remained Catholic. This area is accurately referred to as Flanders. Major centers of the Flemish south were Antwerp and Brussels. Today, this area roughly corresponds to Belgium.
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRoZLo7WG1I/AAAAAAAAA2s/v58WJs_W8zo/s400/M2501.jpg}
    Map of 17 C Europe
    {netherlands-location-map.jpg} Protestant North / Catholic South
    1. DUTCH REPUBLIC / UNITED NETHERLANDS Northern region (Present-day Holland)
    Rembrandt
    Frans Hals
    Judith Leyster
    Johannes Vermeer
    2. FLEMISH Southern region (Present-day Belgium)
    Peter Paul Rubens (traveled extensively >>> a pan-European art)
    Anthony Van Dyck (born in Antwerp, but traveled to Genoa and London)
    For your reference, click this link to refer to the European regions that responded to the "Baroque" style.
    Differences of the "Baroque style" [Northern vs. Southern Europe] through examination of Rubens and Rembrandt's art (c/o Smart History) - video link
    THE DUTCH REPUBLIC
    Different pictorial subjects, styles, & patronage
    So... as you recall from the discussion about the Protestant Reformation and the ensuing Counter Reformation, the Protestant faith forbade art of a religious nature (unlike the Catholic church, which used it to promote their faith). Therefore, it was this very fact that caused artists in the Dutch Republic to invariably turn their attention to alternative subject matter...including the commonplace, everyday "things" surrounding them.
    TYPES OF PAINTING
    (that became popular in the DUTCH REPUBLIC)
    1) Landscapes
    scenes in which the subject matter was dominated by the surrounding natural world
    Marine painting emerged as a 'type' of still-life
    Church painting - scenes of interior sacred spaces
    2) Still-lives (specialization was necessary due to increasing demand for these!)
    flower painting
    vanitas (also referred to as memento mori)
    fowl and other game animals
    breakfast pieces
    Still Life Painting (c/o The Rijksmuseum) - link
    3) Portraits of notable individuals
    merchants
    commemorative portraits (marriages, of general documentary nature, prestige, etc.)
    group portraits (cloth merchant's guild, physician's guild, militia companies, etc.)
    4) Genre scenes (scenes of everyday life)
    side note 1: Many of these paintings were executed on a rather small scale.
    side note 2: And, because major patron behind the artists was no longer the church, a very interesting phenomenon emerged - the increasing importance of the middle class patron and art collector.
    ARTISTS
    REMBRANDT
    LINKS
    Rembrandt's Self Portraits (Smarthistory) - video link
    Rembrandt's Bathsheba at Her Bath (Smarthistory) - video link
    Rembrandt's Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp (Smarthistory) - video link
    Rembrandt's Three Crosses (Smarthistory) - video link
    Rembrandt's Girl at a Window (Smarthistory) - video link
    Baroque Art - Rembrandt (c/o K. Mencher) - link to video
    FRANS HALS
    LINKS
    Frans Hals''s Singing Boy with Flute (Smarthistory) - video link
    Frans Hals''s Malle Babbe (Smarthistory) - video link
    JUDITH LEYSTER
    LINKS
    JOHANNES VERMEER
    LINKS
    The Essential Vermeer (homepage) – anything you ever wanted to know about this artist - link
    A complete, interactive Vermeer Catalog - link
    Google Art Project: Vermeer - link
    Metropolitan Museum of Art: Vermeer - link
    Vermeer's The Glass of Wine (c/o Smart History) - video link
    Vermeer's Young Woman with Pitcher of Water (c/o Smart History) - video link
    Vermeer's Woman Holding a Balance (c/o NGA podcasts) - video link
    Vermeer's The Music Lesson (c/o NGA podcasts) - video link
    Vermeer's Woman Writing a Letter (c/o NGA podcasts) - video link
    PETER PAUL RUBENS
    LINKS
    Ruben's Raising of the Three Crosses (c/o Smart History) - video link
    ANTHONY VAN DYCK
    LINKS

    (view changes)
    5:23 am
  3. page BAROQUE edited ... RUBENS ============================== Below is just a simplification of the visual found ab…
    ...
    RUBENS
    ==============================
    Below is just a simplification of the visual found above...
    Naturalist painters, such as ( ) and ( ), painted with an expressive sense of movement. They employed ( ) and favored the ( ) that imbued their figures with great drama. Inspiration for this school of painting stemmed from the ( ) Renaissance artists, such as Titian. This approach to painting can best be seen in the work of Peter Paul ( ) during the Baroque period.
    TITIAN >>> ( ) >>> ( ) >>> his followers
    ...
    Artimesia Gentileschi √
    Annibale Carracci √
    4a) NETHERLANDS DUTCH REPUBLIC ART OF
    * For your reference, click this link to view the art common to the regions of Northern Europe. Remember, the period classification "Baroque" should NOT erroneously applied to the art created in N. Europe. Such works were not charged with Roman Catholic doctrine and did not celebrate the stories found in Classical mythology (with very few exceptions).
    4b) FLEMISH
    ...
    1) FRENCH BAROQUE
    Nicholas Poussin
    ...
    in Arcadia Ego; PoussinEgo (Nicholas Poussin)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpax0IddSI/AAAAAAAAA3E/PaNDvUwQClA/s320/2524.jpg}
    Self-Portrait; PoussinSelf-Portrait (Nicholas Poussin)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMNoqHzGsI/AAAAAAAAA4k/djIVIicqM4s/s320/poussin75.JPG}
    LINKS - Poussin (general)
    (view changes)
    5:16 am

Sunday, April 30

  1. page BAROQUE edited ... Outline for this page: Baroque - Stylistic Characteristics The 2 two (2) trends of (of …
    ...
    Outline for this page:
    Baroque - Stylistic Characteristics
    The 2two (2) trends of(of Baroque style)
    Regions and& respective arts ofartists (of Baroque style)
    LINKS - Baroque (general)
    Chateau de Versailles - link
    ...
    Classicist painters, such as ( ) and ( ), ( ) favored by the naturalists, and were inspired by artists who favored ( ) - like Raphael. The art of Nicholas ( ) exemplified this school of Baroque painting, which was dominant throughout France throughout the entire 17th Century.
    RAPHAEL >>> ( ) >>> ( ) >>> his followers
    BAROQUE - regionsRegions in which
    ...
    are featured below; [This page -below.
    This page,
    like the others -others, is a
    ...
    is added and refined from time to time.]time.
    1) FRENCH
    Nicholas Poussin √
    ...
    Artimesia Gentileschi √
    Annibale Carracci √
    4a) see belowDUTCH ART OF THE 17th CENTURY [Netherlands / N. Europe] <<< NOT Baroque, though
    * For
    ...
    found in ClassicismClassical mythology (with very
    4b) FLEMISH
    Peter Paul Rubens √
    ...
    1) FRENCH BAROQUE
    Nicholas Poussin
    ...
    in Arcadia EgoEgo; Poussin
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpax0IddSI/AAAAAAAAA3E/PaNDvUwQClA/s320/2524.jpg}
    Self-PortraitSelf-Portrait; Poussin
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMNoqHzGsI/AAAAAAAAA4k/djIVIicqM4s/s320/poussin75.JPG}
    LINKS - Poussin (general)
    ...
    Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions [2008 special exhibition held at the Met] - link to article
    Poussin (c/o Wikipedia) - link
    Georges de laLa Tour
    Adoration
    ...
    the Shepherds (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpa-V6YvtI/AAAAAAAAA3I/W9nBW6R1y2E/s320/2529.jpg}
    Penitent Magdalene (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMM3jXWjVI/AAAAAAAAA4M/I_LdTBZX_8E/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour_007.jpg}
    Penitent Magdalene (detail)[detail] (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMM6raHJsI/AAAAAAAAA4Q/DkFCDZpzAcQ/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour_008.jpg}
    LINKS
    Examine Georges de la Tour's Penitent Magdalene (c/o Met Museum); note that this is an alternate version of the one pictured on this page - link
    Examine Georges de la Tour's Penitent Magdalene (c/o NGA); note that this is an alternate version of the one pictured on this page - link
    ...
    Carpenter's Shop (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMM81RSzOI/AAAAAAAAA4U/XTHJEqIqLn0/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour._St._Joseph%252C_the_Carpenter.JPG}
    ...
    Carpenter's Shop (detail)[detail] (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMNDg2X2RI/AAAAAAAAA4Y/D_GMrT5P6V0/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour_049.jpg}
    ...
    Fortune Teller (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMNJb9eFyI/AAAAAAAAA4c/BsdxCcPncos/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour_016.jpg}
    LINKS
    Examine Georges de la Tour's Fortune Teller (c/o Met Museum) - link
    ...
    of Clubs (Georges de La Tour)
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMNN1LXJYI/AAAAAAAAA4g/etF1Gq7h120/s320/Georges_de_La_Tour_025.jpg}
    LINKS
    Examine Georges de la Tour's Cheat with the Ace of Spades (c/o Kimball Art Museum - Fort Worth Texas) - link
    ...
    Georges de LatourLa Tour (general)
    Georges de laLa Tour (c/o
    ...

    Georges de laLa Tour (c/o
    ...

    Georges de la TtourLa Tour - high
    ...
    Georges de laLa Tour" (informative
    ...

    Georges de laLa Tour's Saint
    2) SPANISH BAROQUE
    Francisco de Zurbarán
    Saint SerapionSerration (Francisco de Zurbarán)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpWpqspP4I/AAAAAAAAA20/qEG5VscBTCg/s320/2426.jpg}
    Diego Velázquez
    ...
    of Seville (Diego Velazquez)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn01pH9olI/AAAAAAAAA2M/3x_zAv9QD1o/s320/2427.jpg}
    ...
    of Spain (aka[aka Fraga Philip)Philip] (Diego Velazquez)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn09fS4EAI/AAAAAAAAA2U/LxUOzrJRWJ8/s320/2428.jpg}
    Las Meninas (aka[aka Maids of Honor)Honor] (Diego Velazquez)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn1VitW_iI/AAAAAAAAA2Y/2gn99i-0nPg/s320/2430.jpg}
    LINKS
    ...
    3) ITALIAN BAROQUE
    Caravaggio
    Entombment (or Deposition)[or Deposition] (Caravaggio)
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpXlcU1sqI/AAAAAAAAA24/zsKnz3SvexQ/s320/2419.jpg}
    LINKS
    Caravaggio's Entombment [or Deposition] - the qualities which make it Baroque and uniquely controversial (c/o Smart History) - link
    ...
    St. Paul (Caravaggio)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpY373LhsI/AAAAAAAAA28/sIqWV1nrIeI/s320/2417.jpg}
    ...
    St. Matthew (Caravaggio)
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpY7TMrZOI/AAAAAAAAA3A/97ErnZrkfiU/s320/2418.jpg}
    LINKS
    ...
    Map of Vatican City
    The Rome that we see today in Vatican City is essentially the Rome that Bernini left it. He literally defined the area in his time so well that there has been little, if any reason to change it in the past 400 years!
    The Baldacchino (St.[St. Peter's - interior)interior] (Bernini)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRp_GJkgKJI/AAAAAAAAA3c/VN9_konddjE/s320/baldacchino-bernini.jpg}
    • Bernini’s first commission, calling for a great bronze baldacchino to be placed under the great dome of St. Peter’s
    ...
    • A synthesis of materials and textures. Materials of brass and wood are present, but bronze is the predominant medium for this work. So much bronze was required to construct this work that Pope Urban VIII ordered workers to secure and dismantle the portico of the Pantheon -- using the bronze from a pagan structure to serve the needs of the Roman Catholic Church.
    • Themes of triumph and grandeur - present here, as they are in most every aspect of the rebuilding of Saint Peter’s complex.
    ...
    Piazza, Arms (Bernini)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn2pHBDGfI/AAAAAAAAA2k/QlzV1x5nrBc/s320/2404.jpg} Bernini: Colonnade or "Arms" (Saint Peter's Square, Rome)
    ...
    old St. PetersPeter's contained a
    There were 2 preexisting structures that Bernini had to factor into his design:
    ancient Egyptian obelisk (moved by Pope Sixtus V in 1585; symbol of Christianity's triumph in Rome)
    ...
    Bernini's Saint Peter's Square (c/o Smart History) - link to video and info
    Baroque Art - The Vatican - Maderno and Bernini (c/o K. Mencher) - link to video
    David (Bernini)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn2gu0O_5I/AAAAAAAAA2g/NIR05WoA2W0/s320/2407.jpg}
    • Took seven months to complete this.
    ...
    Bernini's David (c/o Smart History) - link to video and info
    Baroque Art - Baroque Art and Bernini - David, Ecstasy of Saint Theresa (c/o K. Mencher) - link to video
    ...
    St. Theresa (Bernini)
    Cornaro Chapel (interior) - Santa Maria della Vittoria (Rome, Italy)
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn2bKzpIZI/AAAAAAAAA2c/ulhUg8aMB-I/s320/2401.jpg}
    ...
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRn2wUMEYXI/AAAAAAAAA2o/dwKVKoIWnP4/s320/2408.jpg}
    LINKS
    Bernini's EcstacyEcstasy of Saint
    ...
    and Bernini's EcstacyEcstasy of Saint
    Baroque Art - Baroque Art and Bernini - David, Ecstasy of Saint Theresa (c/o K. Mencher) - link to video
    LINKS - Bernini (general)
    ...
    Take a virtual tour of Bernini's Sant'Andrea al Quirinale (c/o Smart History & Williams College) - link to video and info
    The "Chair of St/ Peter's", Bernini's Cathedra Petri (c/o Smart History) - link to video and info
    ...
    | Smithsonian
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/berninis-genius-11934809/?all
    Cornaro
    - http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/berninis-genius-11934809/?all
    The Cornaro
    Chapel, Romehttp://www.boglewood.com/cornaro/xteresa.htmlRome - http://www.boglewood.com/cornaro/xteresa.html
    When stone
    ...
    | The Guardianhttp://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2006/sep/16/artGuardian - http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2006/sep/16/art
    Artemisia Gentileschi
    • Caravaggio's influence (light and shadow, gory details)
    ...
    high drama (emotional)•(emotional)
    Face of
    • Gentileschi specialized in painted images of women triumphing over men (she was a victim of rape, an event that went to trial).
    Self-portrait (aka[aka Allegory of Painting)Painting] (Gentileschi)
    {http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMO7H7yZpI/AAAAAAAAA4s/jhLFpxFCpfk/s400/10404-self-portrait-as-the-allegory-of-pa-artemisia-gentileschi.jpg}
    LINKS
    Gentileschi's Self Portrait (c/o Smart History) - link to video and info
    Baroque Art - Baroque Art - the Gentileschi (c/o K. Mencher) - link to video
    ...
    Slaying Holofernes (Gentileschi)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpWTBcHf_I/AAAAAAAAA2w/Vn1PE9sPlPk/s320/2420.jpg}
    ...
    the Elders (Gentileschi)
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TSMOQxLruEI/AAAAAAAAA4o/D9bVrLIkSHY/s320/susanna.jpg}
    Annibale Carracci
    ...
    4a) FLEMISH BAROQUE
    (Sir) Peter Paul Rubens
    ...
    the Cross (Rubens)
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpbYBxlBxI/AAAAAAAAA3M/cSUu8Aqvhgw/s320/2502.jpg}
    LINKS
    Ruben's Descent or Raising of the Cross (c/o Smart History) - video link
    Differences of the "Baroque style" [Northern vs. Southern Europe] through examination of Rubens and Rembrandt's art (c/o Smart History) - video link
    Arrival (or Disembarkation)[or Disembarkation] of Marie d'Medici (Rubens)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpbdzFlR4I/AAAAAAAAA3Q/uD5GcOSHVsE/s320/2503.jpg}
    LINKS
    Ruben's Arrival (or Disembarkation)[or Disembarkation] of Marie
    ...
    of War (Rubens)
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FuRLpdMqp5Y/TRpbiunp6DI/AAAAAAAAA3U/9nIpTjUSsS0/s320/2504.jpg}
    LINKS
    ...
    Peter Paul Rubens (c/o Lectures in History) - link to video
    Anthony van Dyck
    Charles V (Anthony van Dyck)
    {2505.jpg}
    * For your reference, click this link to view the art common to the regions of Northern Europe. Remember, the period classification "Baroque" should NOT erroneously applied to the art created in N. Europe. Such works were not charged with Roman Catholic doctrine and did not celebrate the stories found in Classicism (with very few exceptions).
    (view changes)
    8:06 pm
  2. page BAROQUE edited ... RAPHAEL >>> ( ) >>> ( ) >>> his followers BAROQUE - regions in whi…
    ...
    RAPHAEL >>> ( ) >>> ( ) >>> his followers
    BAROQUE - regions in which this "Baroque style" thrived baroque - regions
    √ Denotes artists whose works are featured below; [This page - like the others - is a work-in-progress; content is added from time to time.]
    1) FRENCH
    Nicholas Poussin
    Claude Lorrain
    Louis Le Nain
    Jacques Callot

    Georges de laLa Tour
    2) SPANISH
    FranciscoJose de Ribera
    Francisco
    de Zurbarán
    Diego Velázquez
    3) ITALIAN
    Caravaggio
    Gian Lorenzo Bernini
    Artimesia Gentileschi
    Annibale Carracci
    4b) FLEMISH (for 4a,

    4a)
    see below)
    Peter Paul Rubens
    Anthony van Dyck
    below
    * For your reference, click this link to view the art common to the regions of Northern Europe. Remember, the period classification "Baroque" should NOT erroneously applied to the art created in N. Europe. Such works were not charged with Roman Catholic doctrine and did not celebrate the stories found in Classicism (with very few exceptions).
    4b) FLEMISH
    Peter Paul Rubens √
    Anthony van Dyck √

    1) FRENCH BAROQUE
    Nicholas Poussin
    (view changes)
    7:32 pm
  3. page BAROQUE edited ... 15. Element of “time” 16. Use of the “diagonal” within the composition ====================…
    ...
    15. Element of “time”
    16. Use of the “diagonal” within the composition
    ==============================
    17. Patronage
    18. Baroque sculpture = influenced by ( ) [hint: Which particular period of Ancient Greece?]
    ...
    POUSSIN
    RUBENS
    ================================================
    Naturalist painters, such as ( ) and ( ), painted with an expressive sense of movement. They employed ( ) and favored the ( ) that imbued their figures with great drama. Inspiration for this school of painting stemmed from the ( ) Renaissance artists, such as Titian. This approach to painting can best be seen in the work of Peter Paul ( ) during the Baroque period.
    TITIAN >>> ( ) >>> ( ) >>> his followers
    (view changes)
    1:04 pm
  4. page BAROQUE edited ... Charles V {2505.jpg} * For your reference, click this link to view the art common to the r…
    ...
    Charles V
    {2505.jpg}
    * For your reference, click this link to view the art common to the regions of Northern Europe. Remember, the period classification "Baroque" should NOT erroneously applied to the art created in N. Europe. Such works were not charged with Roman Catholic doctrine and did not celebrate the stories found in Classicism (with very few exceptions).
    (view changes)
    1:03 pm
  5. page BAROQUE edited ... Artimesia Gentileschi Annibale Carracci 4a) 4b) FLEMISH (for 4a, see below) Peter Paul…
    ...
    Artimesia Gentileschi
    Annibale Carracci
    4a)4b) FLEMISH (for 4a, see below)
    Peter Paul Rubens
    Anthony van Dyck
    (view changes)
    1:02 pm

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